Growing Iris

Growing Iris

Romantic Evening Iris

Romantic Evening Iris item #12744

Popular, "old fashioned" perennials. Good plants for perennial beds, borders, cottage gardens, and cut flowers. There are a large number of different types of Iris with a range of colors, flower forms, and heights. Most Irises grow from rhizomes, but Dutch, English, and Juno types grow from bulbs. Most are hardy to at least zone 5, but Dutch types are only hardy to zone 6 and can be grown as annuals in cold climates. Plant rhizomatous types in spring with rhizomes half covered to an inch deep. Iris siberica can also be planted in fall. Plant bulbing types in fall 3 to 4 inches deep. 

Maintenance

Easy-to-grow, low-maintenance plants for full sun. Dutch Iris, Iris pallida, Iris versicolor, and Louisiana types can be grown in part shade. All prefer fertile, well-drained soil. Iris ensata, Louisiana types, and Iris versicolor tolerate wet soils and can be grown around ponds or in rain gardens. Leaves of bulbing types die back in summer after blooming, and prefer dry summer conditions for best performance. They can be planted in containers or in raised beds to improve drainage. Most types of rhizomatous Iris prefer moist soils and tolerate wet soils. They can be divided every 3 to 4 years to maintain vigor. 

Fertilizer Recommendations

Use full rates of Algoflash Flowering Plant 4-6-7 Liquid Fertilizer (51087), Neptune Fish & Seaweed Fertilizer 2-3-1 (51221), or Osmocote 14-14-14 (51173).

Alternative Products

Other plants for cottage gardens include perennial Hollyhocks and Peonies or annual Zinnia.  

Complimentary Products

Moderate to heavy feeders that benefit from fertilization after flowering. Combine bulbing Iris with drought-tolerant perennials like Butterfly Plant or Heliopsis. Rhizomatous varieties are good in combination with perennials like Hibiscus or Cardinal Lobelia (13092) that tolerate wet soils.

Product Recommendations

Moderate to heavy feeders that benefit from fertilization after flowering. Combine bulbing Iris with drought-tolerant perennials like Butterfly Plant or Heliopsis. Rhizomatous varieties are good in combination with perennials like Hibiscus or Cardinal Lobelia (13092) that tolerate wet soils.

Iris Facts

Usually not affected by pest or diseases. Aphids, Iris borer, leaf spot, slugs, and snails are occasional problems. Planting rhizomatous types too deeply can cause rot. Bulbing types may be best grown as annuals in wet climates. Moles and voles sometimes feed on roots. Rhizomes of some types of Iris are fragrant and used in making perfumes. The fleur-de-lis symbol is based on the Iris flower.

Growing Tips