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Growing Lupines

Growing Lupines

Tutti Frutti Lupines

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Popular perennials with tall, dense spikes of pea-like flowers in early summer. Flowers are attractive to butterflies. Somewhat short-lived, especially in hot, humid climates, and can be grown as an annual. Hardy in zones 4 to 8. Transplant or sow outdoors in spring after the danger of frost has passed. Plant so that the roots as deep as when growing in the pots. Seed can be soaked overnight in water or nicked to improve germination. For an early start, sow seed indoors 6 to 8 weeks before outdoor planting time. Cover seed with ½ inch of soil.

Maintenance

Plant in full sun to part shade in fertile, moist, well-drained, slightly acidic soil. Prefers afternoon shade in hot climates. Tall varieties may benefit from support, particularly in windy areas.

Fertilizer Recommendations

Use full rates of Algoflash Flowering Plant 4-6-7 Liquid Fertilizer (51087), Neptune Fish & Seaweed Fertilizer 2-3-1 (51221), or Osmocote 14-14-14 (51173).

Alternative Products

Other hardy perennials with large flower spikes include Dephinium, Foxglove, and Liatris.

Complimentary Products

Lupine is a moderate feeder that benefits from regular fertilization. Other perennials grown for cut flowers include Coneflower, Heliopsis, and Rudbeckia.

Product Recommendations

Use full rates of Algoflash Flowering Plant 4-6-7 Liquid Fertilizer (51087), Neptune Fish & Seaweed Fertilizer 2-3-1 (51221), or Osmocote 14-14-14 (51173).

Lupine Facts

Usually free of serious problems if well sited. Aphids, slugs, snails, and powdery mildew are occasional problems. Prone to rot if grown in heavy or poorly-drained soils. Can be short-lived, especially in hot, humid climates.

Growing Tips